Improv Tip of The Day – Silence

I noticed a lot of people find my blog looking for improv tips. So, I thought I’d give a little tip here and there.

Silence
If you’re scared of having to say something in an imrpov scene…  If you feel on the spot, speechless, or worried that once you open your mouth without a script it won’t close, embrace your hesitation.  Don’t say anything.  Experience being in a scene without saying a word and exploring other options for communication.  Perhaps the other person is speaking and you’re not, how do you respond?  How many times in life do you have scenes with people that don’t involve words?  We spend a lot of time waiting around these days: waiting in line, waiting for the work day to end, waiting for what’s next, etc.  How often do you talk when you’re waiting?  How do you interact with others when you wait? If you’re not talking what are you doing?  How can you establish who you are without speaking?

Enjoy the silence.

National Sketch Writing Month: It’s an Improv Show, Charlie Brown!

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It’s An Improv Show, Charlie Brown!
by Jeremiah Murphy

It’s 9:30pm on a Tuesday night and the Peanuts gang is backstage at the best improv theater they can afford.

CHARLIE BROWN:
O.K. Everyone, gather around for some quick warm-ups.

MARCY:
Peppermint Patty said she’d be twenty minutes late, she had to meet a friend for dinner, sir.

CHARLIE BROWN:
Oh, good grief! This is a show and deserves the same respect you would give to a play or any well planned Youtube video.

LUCY:
I don’t know what we’re doing tonight, Charlie Brown!

LINUS:
Me neither.

Snoopy growls.

CHARLIE BROWN:
Don’t you remember what we went over in rehearsal?

LUCY:
How can you rehearse for improv, Charlie Brown?

LINUS:
We don’t do anything at rehearsal except complain about our day, talk about movies, and push our politics on each other, Charlie Brown.

CHARLIE BROWN:
Good grief! We specifically went over the format for tonight’s show. For our opening let’s each start with a monologue. Then we do two person scenes. Then a monoscene.

LUCY:
I hate that opening, Charlie Brown. I hate opening with monologues! I say we just come out and do a pattern game. They give me ideas for scenes. Ideas for scenes come hard to me, Charlie Brown. I need to do a pattern game!

CHARLIE BROWN:
But we discussed the opening as a group through e-mail and everyone liked it.

LINUS:
Pattern games make the audience feel that they’re watching rehearsals.

LUCY:
Oh, Brother! HOW CAN YOU REHEARSE IMPROV?

SCHROEDER:
Charlie Brown, I know we rehearsed with my musical accompaniment but I’d really like to be in a couple of the scenes tonight.

CHARLIE BROWN:
Schroeder, you are in all the scenes. Your music is a character in every scene!

SCHROEDER:
I feel used, Charlie Browm. Can I please be in a scene? I have some new characters.

CHARLIE BROWN:
Fine, Schroeder. It’s not what we rehearsed, but fine. Lucy and Marcy, did you flyer before the show?

LUCY:
What!?? Begging for an audience is beneath me, Charlie Brown.

MARCY:
You never gave me any flyers, sir.

LUCY:
We need to culture a following Charlie Brown!

CHARLIE BROWN:
ARRRGHHH!!!!!! Who’s going to come see the show tonight!???

MARCY:
I saw two people in the lobby.

LUCY:
They probably work here and are forced to watch the show. That’s the only reason, I can think of anyone seeing our show.

CHARLIE BROWN:
Oh, good grief Lucy, did you ask anyone to come see the show?

LUCY:
No, I’m doing a one-woman show and I’d rather my fans come see that. I don’t have faith in this show. Not yet.

LINUS:
I sent a couple emails Charlie Brown, but got no response.

CHARLIE BROWN:
You have to call people, Linus. You have to call people, let them know you’re thinking about them. People support friends, not people who hide behind emails! Good grief!

LUCY:
If I called people asking them to come see this show, I’d feel like I was begging for money, Charlie Brown.

CHARLIE BROWN:
That’s no attitude to have, Lucy. Let’s all form a circle.

LINUS:
Yes, Lucy, save that negativity for your transaction scenes.

LUCY:
I LIKE TRANSACTION SCENES!

PIG PEN:
What are we doing for an opening, Charlie Brown? And when do we do the monoscene? I feel like Lucy always starts the monoscene too early.

LUCY:
I’m the pace of the show. I start the monoscene when the monoscene needs to be started.

CHARLIE BROWN:
We do the mono-scene after we name the protagonist in the final two person scene.

PIG PEN:
How do we name the protagonist?

CHARLIE BROWN:
I thought we established this in rehearsal!

LUCY:
I’m always the protagonist, with you people AND YOUR MONOLOGUE OPENINGS!!! ARE WE DOING A PATTERN GAME, CHARLIE BROWN OR DO I HAVE TO WORK YOU OVER, YOU BLOCKHEAD?!!

Peppermint Patty enters.

PEPPERMINT PATTY:
Hey, Chuck. Sorry I’m late. I had to meet up with some friends.

CHARLIE BROWN:
Are they coming to the show?

PEPPERMINT PATTY:
Nah. They had tickets to a movie.

Stage Manger enters.

STAGE MANAGER, THE KID WITH THE SAILOR HAT:
5 Minutes, everyone.

Exits.

LUCY:
Five minutes to doom!

LINUS:
Charlie Brown, tell Sally to black us out at 30 minutes.  Our show went too long last week.  The audience wanted to leave.

LUCY:
Yeah, both of them!

SCHROEDER:
Charlie Brown, can I do a standup set before the show?

LUCY:
Stick to the Piano, Schroeder. The man I marry plays the piano and your standup is reminiscent of a young Paul Reiser.

SCHROEDER:
Is that a compliment?

LUCY:
To Paul Reiser maybe it is.

CHARLIE BROWN:
I just got five text messages from people saying they can’t make the show. Why do they always send messages like that right before I go on stage? I feel so horrible about myself when right before I’m about to perform people tell me they can’t be bothered.

PEPPERMINT PATTY:
What are we doing for an opening, Chuck? I hate putting a together a show five minutes before we go on.

CHARLIE BROWN:
Then why didn’t you get here earlier?

LINUS:
Are we going to ask for a suggestion, Charlie Brown? Because we never use them and I feel that just insults the audience.

LUCY:
What audience?

CHARLIE BROWN:
Come on team, we pay for the space.

LUCY:
I don’t pay to perform, Charlie Brown. I don’t play to perform. You pay me to perform! Got it?

CHARLIE BROWN:
We ask for three suggestions.

LUCY:
OH, BROTHER! WE DON’T EVEN HAVE THREE AUDIENCE MEMBERS!

PEPPERMINT PATTY:
Guys, I’m nervous about the show. Are we doing a pattern game?

CHARLIE BROWN:
Good Grief!

PEPPERMINT PATTY:
Chuck, let’s go over what kind of edits we use. So we’re all on the same page. I tapped out Marcy last week and she thought I was joining the scene instead of replacing her.

MARCY:
Sorry sir.

PEPPERMINT PATTY:
No apologies necessary Marce, we’ve never discussed the subject despite all the hours wasted at Champion Studios.

CHARLIE BROWN:
That’s a good idea, Peppermint Patty. To edit a scene we can use tap-outs, organic edits, and sweep-edits.

LUCY:
I hate sweep edits! I feel like a hack!

LINUS:
You are a—

LUCY:
(making a fist)
JUST SAY IT, BLOCKHEAD! JUST SAY IT!

CHARLIE BROWN:
We can also color scenes with edits from the backline such as “Cut to—“

LUCY:
I HATE “THE MOVIE!” AND I HATE STANDING ON THE BACKLINE! WHY CAN’T WE STAND IN THE WINGS, CHARLIE BROWN?!!

CHARLIE BROWN:
…”That sounds like a song,” you can also yell “freeze!” then reposition the people in the scene so when they unfreeze –

PEPPERMINT PATTY:
That’s enough Chuck. Thanks. You got all that, Marce?

SCHROEDER:
What’s a monoscene?

CHARLIE BROWN:
OH, GOOD GRIEF!!!

Dear Acting Diary: Even More Improv Acting Tips

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Dear Acting Diary,

I’ve noticed that a lot of people are reading my blog by searching for “improv acting tips” so I thought I’d write a few more.

When performing in an improv show, here’s a couple things that I’ve noticed:

Tell and Show
If you describe something, say in your opening monologue* or in a conversation that occurs in a scene, the audience wants to see it.  The old creative writing rule, “show, don’t tell” can be slightly modified to “tell, then show.”  So at some point if you’re talking about that time Grandpa bought a couple boxes of Theraflu thinking they were Kool-Aid, show that scene during the show.  It’s an easy laugh.

Killing Anticipation
Another thing to keep in mind is anticipation.  Anticipation works great in movies, plays, and books.  It doesn’t work out so great in improv.  By “anticipation” I mean talking about doing something in a scene and waiting for that something to happen.  If you do this, a couple things are going on: 1) You’re not really being present in the moment, you’re waiting for something better to happen which won’t happen because you’re waiting for it; 2) The audience will either get bored or expect something crazy to blow up; or 3) If you’re talking about doing something, you’re telling and not showing–people want to see something on stage, so show ‘em what you got.

Here’s how I suggest “killing” anticipation. If people in a scene are talking about something that is going to happen or are planning something (a heist, a birthday party, a family, etc.)–edit the scene!   Stop it as soon as you can tell what the characters are describing.  Then in the next scene show whatever it is the performers were talking about.  My favorite way of editing an “anticipation scene” is to yell “cut-to the birthday party! (Or whatever it is in your scene).”  

“Cut to”  is an edit used in “The Movie,” a form of longform improv where the improvisers perform an improvised movie using improvised plots, scene painting (improvisors tell the audience details of the appearance of the setting or characters), and screenwriting terms (for example: describing and performing cinematic shots, such as “birds eye view” or “close up,” and transitions, such as “cut to.”)

Another favorite of mine to kill anticipation is to edit the scene and do a “cut to” edit making the next scene take place after the object of anticipation has passed.  For example if someone in  a scene is talking about how their dog can talk, edit the scene and do a “cut to after the dog has spoken.”  Then the improvisors have to react to “what just happened” instead about talking about something about to happen.  Try it, it’s funny.  If characters are planning a birthday party in one scene, cut to after the birthday party.  This is an old comedic screenwriting trick.  It works!

That’s all for today!  If you have any questions about improv, leave it in the comments.  Thanks for reading my blog!

*If you’re not too familiar with longform improv, improv that consists of scenes and/or monologues that last for around 20 minutes and longer, some shows are begun with the improvisers or a special guest delivering either a prepared or improvised monologue which the improvisers use for generating scenes.  Some shows use one “monologist” or up to however many improvisers their are in the group.

Dear Acting Diary: More Improv Acting Tips

Once again, I noticed folks were finding my blog looking for “Improv Acting Tips.” I already wrote one post about this topic but I thought I’d give it another go if people are interested in improv. If you have any improv questions, drop me a question in the comments below.

Coach Anton Caruthers from the Improv Show Character Dogville

A little bit about me and improv: I started studying at the Upright Citizens Brigade Theater in 2000 and went on to study at the Peoples Improv Theater (both in New York City). I also worked as an improvisational strolling character actor for a while and have been on all sorts of improv teams in New York. So, if you were curious were these tips come from, there you go.

IMPROV ACTING TIPS, Part 2

Touch Your Partner’s Shoulder: I know this sounds silly and if your partner doesn’t want to be touched, don’t. But one of the best ways to get “into the moment” fast and create a little relationship in an improvised scene is to place your hand on your scene partner’s shoulder, arm, or back. This connects the two of you and kind of gives the scene some “honesty”–for lack of a better word. Don’t grope, just a light hand on the shoulder does it.

Specifics: Did I mention this one last time? It should have been the first improv tip. Specifics, details, and names are very funny. Try it out. As one acting teacher asked my class, what’s more interesting asking for some whiskey or asking for some Jack Daniels? They say you can’t really learn how to be funny, but if you’re real specific with your work, you’ll get some laughs. And it doesn’t have to be brand names, it can be with object work (miming your physical environment), specifying to yourself what emotion your character’s feeling in the scene, etc.

The more specific your choices the more you and your scene partner can play with them. Details make something interesting and hold the audience’s attention. The next time a con-artist tries something on you, notice all the detail they throw into their story.

Specifics Part 2, Introduce Yourself: Seriously. Specifics, y’all. If you’re starting your scene and don’t know what to do, in a sentence introduce who you are, where you are from and what exactly you want. The trick is to cram your introduction with as much detail as you can so your scene partner and you will have all sorts material.

They (the improv elite) say the best scenes are between characters who know each other. Well, if you’re introducing youself in the beginning of the scene and want to follow this rule, introduce yourself as someone your scene partner obviously knows. Here’s an example: “Hello, John, I, being your step-father Andre who was born on Minnow lane, two towns over, and want to win over your olympic backstroke champion Mother, Eileen, have decided to spend the day with you at your part time job, here at the Dairy Queen drive-thru window.” Sounds like too much? It is, but maybe your character gives too much information whenever he talks. And besides you could do a great many scenes with that information. You could do a scene about a step-father and son who don’t get along, you could do a scene about a step-father getting in the way of his step-son at work, you could do a scene about the step-son confronting his step-dad, you could do a scene about the ice cream machine breaking and the step-father tries to explain to his customers how his step-son is trying his best. The more details, the more options, so stuff as many character, environment, and relationship details in the beginning of a scene. And remember, you don’t have to speak these details you can use your movement and object (or mime) work to indicate all sorts of details as well.

Don’t Talk: Try it out. Don’t know what to say in an improv scene? Don’t say anything. Don’t ignore your partner. You can fully enagge your scene partner and still be silent. How, you ask? Give it a shot and find out. But don’t indicate that you can’t speak. Just do other things besides speaking. This exersize might make your more physical, more subtle, or just more interesting to watch. See what happens.

What Do I Do, My Partner’s an Ass? It’s going to happen. Sooner or later you’re going to be in a scene where you’re not getting along with your partner. Perhaps he or she is “showboating” (hogging the stage), perhaps he or she doesn’t understand what’s going on, perhaps he or she is being a Silly Monster (making no sense and a lot of noise), perhaps your scene partner is making you uncomfortable by getting too close, or perhaps your partner is taking the scene in a direction which offends your values. If you feel your scene partner is making you uncomfortable just gracefully exit the scene (“Oh shit, I left a roast in the oven”). It’s not worth it to endure any more abuse than is already involved in an improv show. If your partner is offending you with the subject matter of the scene, try to stop censoring yourself and accept your partner’s offer. Maybe through sincerity and faithfully giving into the scene you can redeem it. If your partner doesn’t understand what’s going on–hoo boy, that’s rough but it’s improv and the audience is forgiving and might even find it funny. Try to steer your partner back to reality by restatingthe facts and confusion of the scene. For example: “Oh, I’m sorry, this is a battleship? I thought I was in a dentist’s office. That’s the fifth time this week I’ve made that mistake.” If you’re are in a scene with a Silly Monster who’s just being loud and not paying attention to you, try to win the audience over by being quiet and balancing out the Silly Monster with a subtle performance. Perhaps your character is trying to have a phone call and just glares at the Silly Monster? Give it a shot. If you’re scene partner is hogging the stage, being hilarious, and not really paying attention to you, that’s a real pain but maybe the audience is enjoying themselves. Sometimes you just have to wait for the storm to pass and use any of the above mentioned tips to steer the scene in another direction or end it.

That’s it for this session of improv tips. I’ll be back with some more, perhaps some tips on improvising characters. Let me know what you want to hear.

The Jeremiah Times: Improv Show Monday 1/19 @ 7pm, Music, 2009 Predictions, & McOwskey

Dear Fellow Travellers, Bon Vivants, Famed Explorers, and Ne’er-do-wells, 
Happy 2009! I hope everyone is having a good start to a year that critics are already calling “A-Hold-On-To-Your-Seat-Thrill Ride,”  ”A Perplexing Tapestry of Suspense,” and “You Have to See It To Believe It!”
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Since you’re probably wondering, here are my predictions for 2009:

Total Economic and Social Collapse
Total Economic and Social Recovery
Cats will gain the ability to speak and clog UN proceedings  with requests of boiled Chicken and crinkly ball toys
New York will become part of Rhode Island
Jiminy Cricket will once again be the talk of the town – much to the chagrin of F. Murray Abraham.
A scientist in a garage will discover the cure to cottonmouth.
We will all be amazed by the new video phone
Ginger will be the new chocolate
The best selling book will be titled “I Can’t Believe It IS Butter: How We Were Lied To for Over 20 Damn Years”
We will start living in domed cities underwater and in Ohio.
Billie will lose Phil Collin’s number and he will go on a bender.
A Computer will run for president.
We will all wear caps made out of Polio.
The sky will be slightly less blue as fossil fuels are replaced with corn ethanol.
Osama Bin Laden will come out of hiding to take advantage of the President’s Day Sale at T.J. Max 
Bill Clinton will grow three feet taller and roam the Pacific Northwest, terrorizing hunters.
Bill Gates will grow five feet shorter and cobble shoes together from pixie dust and copper.
The George W. Bush Presidential Library will amaze youngsters with its collection of Encyclopedia Brown DVDs.
There will be a world wide coffee shortage, causing people to wake up routinely at 11am and “be fine with it.”
Joe Rogan will come out from retirement.
Anderson Cooper will star in a sitcom where he moves in with his crazy uncle (Tom Wopat) to run the family thrift store.

And finally you will laugh next Monday, 1/19, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day at…

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CHARACTER DOGVILLE – Monday, MLK Day, 1/19 @7pm
Improv Comedy from Kooky Characters
Featuring characters by: Jeremiah Murphy, Carrie Sipple, Wayne Henry, Stacy Mayer, Luke Meginsky, Ryan Stratton, and Justin Herfel
Where? The Peoples Improv Theater, 154 West 29th Street
How Much? Five Dollars
More info: http://thepit-nyc.com/daily.html?y=2009&m=01&d=19
characterdogville.com
This is our second show at the PIT and they want to see if we can draw a big crowd. If you’re free that night come on by. Then after the show we can all discuss…
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In honor of Dr. King I recommend checking out on of his greatest but often forgotten speeches, “Beyond Vietnam,” which really slams the establishment with a call to oppose the unholy trinity of racism, militarism, and materialism. Beyond Vietnam: http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/mlkatimetobreaksilence.htm
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Vote McOwskey!
You can help your favorite gubernatorial candidate two ways:
1. Vote on what slogans should go into his sticker campaign at: http://www.quibblo.com/quiz/6czfgI0/What-slogans-should-the-McOwskey-campaign-use-in-its-sticker-campaign?view_quiz=1
2. Help Eddie find his way to winning the election (maze attached)
McOwskey.com
  (click image to enlarge)
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Music:
I’ve been learning how to use “Garageband” and I made the attached song using the instrument samples and pulled some sound clips from a “Hugh and Laurie” sketch as well as the CBS news.
bailout
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That’s it from this issue of the Jeremiah Times. I hope everyone is well!

Jeremiah

 

 

Jeremiah’s Improv Acting Tips

I first started studying and performing improv comedy around 2000. There are various ways to improvise on stage, here are the main ones that come to mind: short form (sometimes called “Theatre Games”), long form (typically a 20-45 minute show based off a suggestion or two), stand-up comedy/hosting (ad libbing or riffing with a crowd), and improvising in a play when something goes wrong ( a dropped line, a misfired sound effect, scenery falling, etc.). Improv can even help you in any stressful situation. Stressful situations are worrisome because the future is unknown. Well, in improv the unknown future is used as a foundation to develop techniques to make the most of the present.

Whatever way you end up improvising, here are some techniques and tips I’ve learned and try to use (primarily onstage, but sometimes in the ‘real world’):

Agreement. Agree with whatever’s given to you by either your scene partner, uncontrollable events, or whatever it is you’re playing with. If you’re in a play and someone calls you by the wrong name you can mention that it’s your middle name, you can say you haven’t been called that in ages, etc. Audiences love when a snafu is addressed and incorporated. You can’t lose. A common way to teach the technique of agreement is “Yes and” where you say “yes” to what your partner offers you and then add to it. This is a good way to make party chit chat more amusing.

Example:

Person 1: You have a great haircut.

Person 2: Yes, thank you, I did it myself and would now like to cut your’s so we can both look amazing.

A lot of people assume you have to be negative to be funny. And there’s a lot of funny self deprecating/hyper critical comedy out there. But don’t be afraid of positive comedy, the comedy of agreement, the comedy of embracing what is present. It will be even funnier to agree with someone or something than to negate it. Negation is often frowned upon in the improv world. It can kill a scene.

Example of “negating”:

Person 1: You have a great haircut.

Person 2: I look horrible, you’re crazy. Go away.

If you’re the victim of someone negating you onstage, turn it into an agreement.

Example:

Person 1: Yo have a great haircut.

Person 2: I look horrible, you’re crazy. Go away.

Person 1: OK, let me just finish packing my suitcases. I don’y know where I’ll wind up, but you’ve always guided me well in the past.

Don’t Go Crazy/Don’t Try To Be Funny/Reacting Vs. Creating. I learned this lesson through crash and burn. In improv its easy to have funny ideas in your head that don’t go with what’s going on in the scene. It’s OK to use your ideas to start a scene or to fix a problem, but I find it’s always better to go with the flow of a scene instead of trying to overpower it with your ideas. If you think your idea fits into the scene use it, if it doesn’t–save it for another scene, another show, a comedy sketch, or an amusing email forward. For example if you’re doing a scene and you think it would be funny to just start yelling in French and making poop gestures (whatever those may be), its going to look more out of place than funny. Save it for your Fringe festival show. A good technique is just to react with what’s in the scene by listening and not worrying about generating material. You’ll be surprised at the ideas that come to you if you just listen and react. One of my favorite improv class exercises is the “Boring Scene” where two people do a scene and they can’t do anything they consider amusing. Often times, the improv coach or instructor will make a buzz sound whenever someone starts to be funny. It sounds dull, and a lot of these scenes take place at bus stations and waiting rooms, but they always come across as hilarious to me. I think because it removes the pressure of generating ideas and you just focus on reacting. This may not seem like it applies to Stand Up and Hosting style ad libbing or improv, but sometimes riffing with the audience can be as entertaining as a few bits.

Singing, Music, Dance, Movement, Mime Work. It’s easy to improvise with just two people talking. Any way you can get out of this mold is a sure fire way of amusing the audience.

Use Your Audience. Some audiences are timid, some aren’t. If your audience seems cool nothing pays off like using a suggestion they offer, dropping their names, or commenting on noises coming from the audience of theater (when someone sneezes, God Bless them, when a heating pipe starts to bang, mime calling the landlord to make a request for repair). Audiences like feeling involved.

Eye Contact. Make eye contact with your scene partner (and in some cases your audience), this will help focus. You don’t have to keep it for the whole scene but you should start a scene by making eye contact with your partner.

Names. Give your scene partners names if they don’t have one already. Likewise, in a real world situation using your conversation partner’s name is a good way to snap wandering minds to the present.

Do Stuff. If you give yourself things to do in a scene (tie shoe laces, wash dishes, any action) it will help the scene. It only works however when you don’t talk about what you’re doing. For example tie your shoe laces and talk about what a great lunch you had. Comedy!

Relationships. Keep the scenes about you and your scene partner, don’t make them about things the audience can’t see. You can add details but keep the scene about your relationship with your scene partner. Do you guys like each other? Is one of you high status? Decide these things early on but be willing to go with the flow or correct miscommunications.

Example 1:

Person 1: Come on sis, let’s start acting like grown-ups.

Person 2: Reginald, I am your mother, I wish you’d stop treating me like your sister. Although I did enjoy the Jelly Bracelets for my birthday.

Example 2:

Person1: Come on sis, let’s start acting like grown-ups.

Person 2: Whoah, this whole time I thought I was your mother, what did you put in this coffee?

Juxtapose. I think it’s always easy to get a laugh with juxtaposition. If you play against the audiences expectations you’ll probably get a laugh. Examples: I have a character Sealegs McGoo who’s an old sea captain and grumpy. As a gag, I made him the author of an advice column, so during shows he pulls out letters to read from wayward souls seeking guidance . Also, my character Chuckles The Birthday Bear–a children’s party performer– is always looking for a pack of smokes he lost.

Jeremiah’s Character Lab: Tooth Fairy

Check out my latest character straight from my top secret character lab. Then check out Character Dogville, Friday’s at 10:00PM.

Character Dogville Video Ad

Made fresh this morning, cramming together rehearsal chit-chat and a monologue from Professor Damrosch:

Acting/Improv 201: Negative Energies

This 10-week class will focus intensely on bringing down a group energy before a show or rehearsal and using the deflated momentum to make people listen to your daily setbacks. Learn how to complain on the exhale, make big stinks about your routine, say “no” in huge ways with extensive tales of trivial woe and superfluous opinions, and set the rehearsal or show off to a late start and hopefully an off-note. All lessons are set to explore and create immediate bitter observations, sarcasm, and disagreement. Surprise, shock, and passive aggressively nudge yourself and take this class. Some classes will simulate an actual three hour warm-up session to show you how exactly to draw out pre-show jib jab until its too late to rehearse.


Pre-requisite: Level Yes But
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VOTE: Which Character Should I Be This Week?

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